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Our Artisans

 

Each artisan has perfected his or her craft over generations, with fathers passing on the traditions of metallurgy and glass blowing to their sons and mothers sharing the skills of sewing and basket weaving to their daughters.

We pride ourselves in working hand-in-hand with local artisans from around the world, in order to bring you only those products that have been touched, formed and created by hand, as they have been for thousands of years.

We believe that each artisan deserves a living wage for their beautiful, one-of-a-kind works, and we are proud to support their efforts and encourage the passing on of the old ways. The attention to detail is tangible – just touch your feet to our rugs or let your hands run over our lampshades and you’ll feel the difference.

This isn’t just a cheap knock-off of traditional products mass-produced in a factory. This is the real deal, made by a real artisan.

Meet the Artisans behind your Interior Accents

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Mehria

Mehria creates some of Tunisia’s finest kilim rugs and pillows in the small mountain village of Sidi Mtir, 110 miles to the northwest of the capital of Tunisia. Mehria believes in the power of skilled crafts to empower people, which is why she formed the Local Forest Products Association to assist at-risk women in her community.

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Aziz

Aziz, age 59, is a metallurgist who finds beauty in minor imperfections. His small workshop can be found in the town of Kasr Helal, 200 miles south of Tunis. He considers his work as an art, and forges fine lamps and chandeliers to support his wife and two children, with the hopes of one day passing on his skills to the next generation.

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Besma

The artisan behind Kamsah’s popular footas and other fine linens, Besma creates her works in the small town of Enfidha, 60 miles to the south of the capital of Tunisia. An art professor by day, she works in a small, traditional workshop in her home whenever she is not in the classroom in order to keep the old ways of the needle alive.

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Hamma

At 61 years old, “Uncle” Hamma is one of the last authentic artisans in the city of Nabeul, which sits right on the shores of the Mediterranean about 40 miles from Tunis. He has been honing his skill for more than 50 years and oversees the entire process of basket and bag weaving, from collecting the different materials to placing each reed by hand.